TECHNIQUE


FOILING 360 WITH PROGRESSION


Are you ready for it? Yes, probably! If you can ride around comfortably, are carving back and forth on the foil, maybe getting some foot changes in (or are getting frustrated and want to try something else) then you are likely ready for the next challenge. Rob Claisse from Progression is back this issue with more foiling video technique assistance

WORDS AND VIDEO: Rob Claisse / Progression

We’re getting more and more kitefoilers asking, “What should I learn next?”. Tacking is an obvious next step, but can be confusing and takes some time to truly master. Thankfully, there is a great sidestep that uses the same kite technique as the tack, but is generally easier to learn with more success: the 360.

TECHNIQUE


FOILING 360 WITH PROGRESSION


Are you ready for it? Yes, probably! If you can ride around comfortably, are carving back and forth on the foil, maybe getting some foot changes in (or are getting frustrated and want to try something else) then you are likely ready for the next challenge. Rob Claisse from Progression is back this issue with more foiling video technique assistance

WORDS AND VIDEO: Rob Claisse / Progression

We’re getting more and more kitefoilers asking, “What should I learn next?”. Tacking is an obvious next step, but can be confusing and takes some time to truly master. Thankfully, there is a great sidestep that uses the same kite technique as the tack, but is generally easier to learn with more success: the 360.

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As you can see I start this 360 riding on my heelside, I carve upwind (as if going into a tack) and then carve all the way round so I end up heading in the same direction I started. The kite is looped in the second half of the manoeuvre. It looks pretty cool; it feels even better and the consequences when you get it wrong are pretty low impact (you naturally get pulled away from the foil!), so it’s a perfect trick for any intermediate kitefoiler to have a go at. Firstly, let’s be clear on two approaches that won’t help with your foiling 360: It’s NOT a back roll. Too many people attack the 360 like it’s a back roll, driving off their back foot throughout, throwing the board and foil around. This often leads to the foil launching out of the water and your body leaning right into the turn. This then forces the second misconception… Don’t use the loop of the kite to pull you out of the rotation with loads of power. Looping the kite happens more out of necessity because of where it ends up, far overhead. The loop allows you to get the kite round and pointing back in the correct direction, giving you a nice, even pull in the powerzone. As with the surfboard tack we looked at in the last issue, the kite and bar movement is vital and very similar in the first 180. Again, we can look at this move in three stages:

STAGE 1: SHEET OUT - FULLY When the kite reaches 12, sheet out fully and carve upwind. Your weight is slightly on your back foot to start this carving motion. STAGE 2: SHEET IN - PARTIALLY When the board points into the wind, start to sheet in which will allow you to get your body up over the board and, importantly, more weight driving down through your front leg. Notice how the bar is level at this stage so the kite sits above you. STAGE 3: SHEET IN - FULLY As you pass the halfway mark, it’s time to sheet in fully so you can keep your body over the board, weight forward. Now when you pull hard with your backhand the kite will loop high and tight in the powerzone. BONUS TIP As you enter the 360, take your front hand off the bar and leave it off for the whole manoeuvre. You don’t need it! The backhand does all the bar control and steering so it will stop you accidentally getting confused and pulling with the wrong hand midway round.

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As with the tack, it’s vital that the kite gets to 12, then you sheet out so it travels far overhead. In doing so, when you carve the kite can fly with you through that middle stage of the carve. Once you start getting some consistency in your heelside 360, it’s a smaller step to learn how to stop halfway and convert it into a heelside to toeside tack. Nail that and you’ll open yourself up to all the different tacks and a whole array of 360 variations; all using a similar kite and bar technique, with your weight distribution essentially remaining the same.

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Extended version of this Progression 360 video tutorial:

If you’re still working on your gybes, check out Progression’s Foiling Gybes video collection, that includes riding toeside, foot changes and their newly released carving turns video:

More help learning to 360 or any further kitefoiling technique, check out Progression Live Camps and private coaching:

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